A view of Mt. Fuji, photogravure, NYPL

A view of Mt. Fuji, photogravure, NYPL

Spring ’17 Courses

AHUM UN1400 Colloquium on Major Texts: East Asia

Section 001 Paul Anderer
T 4:10-6:00
522C Kent Hall

Section 002 Wei Shang
T 2:10-4:00
507 Philosophy Hall

Section 003 Conrad Schirokauer
W 12:10-2:00
613 Hamilton Hall

Section 004 Itsuki Hayashi
Th 2:10-4:00
301M Fayerweather

Section 005 Seong-Uk Kim
M 12:10-2:00
420 Pupin Laboratories

Section 006 Charles Woolley
Th 4:10-6:00
522C Kent Hall

This course explores the core classical literature in Chinese, Japanese and Korean Humanities. The main objective of the course is to discover the meanings that these literature offer, not just for the original audience or for the respective cultures, but for us. As such, it is not a survey or a lecture-based course. Rather than being taught what meanings are to be derived from the texts, we explore meanings together, informed by in-depth reading and thorough ongoing discussion. This course can be taken to fulfill part of the Global Core requirement.

 

ASCE UN1359 Intro to East Asian Civ: China
Harrison Huang
TR 2:40-3:55
717 Hamilton Hall

The evolution of Chinese civilization from ancient times to the twentieth century, with emphasis on characteristic institutions and traditions. Discussion Section Required (ASCE V2360). This course can be taken to fulfill part of the Global Core requirement.

 

ASCE UN1361 Intro to East Asian Civ: Japan
Gregory Pflugfelder
MW 4:10-5:25
702 Hamilton Hall

A survey of important events and individuals, prominent literary and artistic works, and recurring themes in the history of Japan, from prehistory to the 20th century. Discussion Section Required (ASCE V2371). This course can be taken to fulfill part of the Global Core requirement.

 

EAAS GU3322 East Asian Cinema
Ying Qian
M 4:10-6:00
509 Hamilton Hall

This course introduces the aesthetics and politics of East Asian cinema from the Silent era to the present as part of the region’s intertwining histories. This course can be taken to fulfill part of the Global Core requirement.

 

EAAS UN3412 Colloquium: Conflict and Culture in Korean History
Jungwon Kim
M 12:10-2:00
302 Fayerweather

This course considers how accounts of conflict in Korean history reflect the development of core values, ethical priorities and emotions, and perceptions among Koreans from the late sixteenth century to the late twentieth century. By carefully examining the narrative and rhetorical styles of major accounts of problems such as wars, political strife, family tensions, and intellectual and personal tribulations at a given cultural and historical time, students will not only understand how Koreans have dealt with conflict throughout history but will also develop reading strategies for primary sources contested by and narrated in a multiplicity of ideologies, genres, and voices.

 

EAAS UN3843 Culture of Food and Health in Japan
Joshua Schachet
Th 4:10-6:00
307 Mathematics Building

This course will introduce students to core themes, concepts, and events in the history of early modern and modern Japan, through the lens of food and health – the dietary trends, choices, and notions of proper eating that informed the relationship between people’s inner bodies and the world around them. We will inquire into how these concepts came into being, how they helped shape conceptions of the body, the self, and the everyday in historical context, and what other ways of making sense of health and diet may have been subsumed in the process. Along the way, we will discuss how and why ‘eating right’ became such a central topic of debate in Japan from the seventeenth century to the present, how that debate has changed over time, and what it can tell us about the broader trends that shape our understanding of Japanese and East Asian historical trajectory.

 

HSEA UN3871 Modern Japan: Images and Words
Gregory Pflugfelder
T 4:10-6:00
511 Hamilton Hall

This course relies primarily on visual materials to familiarize students with the history of Japan from the beginning of the nineteenth century through the present. It follows a chronological order, introducing students to various realms of Japanese visual culture—from woodblock prints to film, anime, and manga—along with the historical contexts that they were shaped by, and in turn helped shape. Special attention will paid to the visual technologies of nation-building, war, and empire; to historical interactions between Japanese and Euro-American visual culture; to the operations of still versus moving images; and to the mass production of visual commodities for the global marketplace. Students who take the course will emerge not only with a better understanding of Japan’s modern historical experience, but also with a more discerning eye for the ways that images convey meaning and offer access to the past.

 

EAAS GU3844 Health and Society in East Asia 
Nicholas Bartlett
Th 10:10-11:25
307 Milbank Hall (Barnard)

This course employs anthropological analysis to examine how Western psychiatric practices have been received and transformed in East Asia and discusses alternative traditions of healing.

 

HSEA UN3898 The Mongols in History
Morris Rossabi
T 10:10-12:00
603 Hamilton Hall

Study of the role of the Mongols in Eurasian history, focusing on the era of the Great Mongol Empire. The roles of Chinggis and Khubilai Khan and the modern fate of the Mongols to be considered.

 

EAAS UN3990 Approaches to East Asian Studies
Robert Hymes
W 4:10-6:00522C Kent Hall

This course is intended to provide a focal point for undergraduate majors in East Asian Studies. It introduces students to the analysis of particular objects of East Asian historical, literary, and cultural studies from various disciplinary perspectives. The syllabus is composed of a series of modules, each centered around an object, accompanied by readings that introduce different ways of understanding its meaning.

 

EAAS UN3901 Senior Thesis
Paul Anderer
TBA

Prerequisites: Senior majors only. Senior Seminar required of all majors in East Asian Studies.

 

Graduate & Undergraduate

JPNS GU4008 Readings in Classical Japanese: Heian to Meiji
Tomi Suzuki
TR 10:10-11:25
412 Pupin Laboratories

Close readings of specific texts, as well as methods, skills, and tools.

 

EAAS GU4202 The Dead in Ancient China
Jue Guo
M 10:10-12:00
TBA

What did the dead become? Ancestors, spirits, or ghosts? Are these postmortem categories and roles ontologically distinct and mutually exclusive? How did the dead become ancestors, spirits, or ghosts? Where did the dead go and what kind of “lives after” did they have? With these questions in mind, this course explores the realm of the dead in ancient China (ca. 5000 B.C.E.-600 C.E.) instantiated by the living in rituals, objects, and writings. Focusing on contemporaneous materials obtained through archaeology, facilitated with transmitted history and literature when available, students will read about and learn to analyze a variety of conceptions of the dead and corresponding afterlife options recorded in diverse kinds of sources including material culture, architecture, artifacts, pictorial representations, and texts from ancient China.

 

HSEA GU4220 Islam in China and Inner Asia
David Brophy
Th 4:10-6:00
414 Pupin Laboratories

This seminar surveys the history of Islam, both in the Chinese interior and neighboring Inner Asia (primarily Xinjiang), from its arrival to the twentieth century.

 

HSEA GU4230 Empires & Migrations of the Pacific World
Peter Hamilton
Th 10:10-12:00
4A Kraft Center

This research seminar examines how Asian, European, and American empires have channeled, categorized, and regulated human movement in the Pacific since the 1500s.

 

EAAS GU4232 Trauma and Testimonial Narrative in Post-Mao Chinese Lit
Yan Wang
T 4:10-6:00
303 Hamilton

Is the Cultural Revolution the Holocaust of China? This seminar seeks to arrive at a deeper understanding of the Cultural Revolution and its tragic roots in analogical thinking.

 

HSEA GU4230 Empires in the Formation of Modern East Asia, 1700-1950
Victor Louzon
M 4:10-6:00
424 Pupin Laboratories

This research seminar examines how Asian, European, and American empires have channeled, categorized, and regulated human movement in the Pacific since the 1500s.

 

EARL GU4320 Buddhism and Korean Culture
Seong-Uk Kim
W 12:10-2:00
522A Kent Hall

In this course, we will explore the histories, doctrines, rituals, and practices of the major religious traditions of Korea, including Buddhism, Confucianism, and Christianity as well as Shamanism and new religions. We will look at how these religions have interacted with each other, as well as the ways in which they have been both influenced and been shaped by Korean culture and politics. We will also pay close attention to the ways in which Korea has developed its own distinctive religious traditions on the basis of active interactions with those of other countries: Korea was exposed to Buddhism, Confucianism, and Catholicism through China, as well as Protestantism which was brought directly from the West. We will explore how Koreans not only transformed these imported traditions and incorporated elements of their own indigenous traditions to meet their own religious needs, but also served as active agents or participants in the development, for example, of pan-East Asian religious traditions such as Hwaŏm/Huayan/Kegon Buddhism.

 

HSEA GU4410 The U.S., Asia, & The History of International Development, 1898-Present
Simon Toner
W 10:10-12:00
507 Kent Hall

This seminar for advanced undergraduates and M.A. students explores the history of empires in East Asia, from the 18th century to the end of WWII.

 

EAAS GU4572 Chinese Documentary Cinema
Ying Qian
W 4:10-6:00
413 International Affairs Building

What defines a “documentary” film? How do documentaries inform, provoke and move us?  What formal devices and aesthetic strategies do documentaries use to construct visions of reality and proclaim them as authentic, credible and authoritative? What can documentary cinema teach us about the changing Chinese society, and about cinema as a medium for social engagement?    This seminar introduces students to the aesthetics, epistemology and politics of documentary cinema in China from the 1940s to the present, with an emphasis on contemporary films produced in the past two decades.  We examine how documentaries contended history, registered subaltern experiences, engaged with issues of gender, ethnicity and class, and built new communities of testimony and activism to foster social change. Besides documentaries made by Chinese filmmakers, we also include a small number of films made on China by western filmmakers, including those by Joris Ivens, Michelangelo Antonioni, Frank Capra and Carma Hinton.  Topics include documentary poetics and aesthetics, evidence, performance and authenticity, the porous boundaries between documentary and fiction, and documentary ethics. As cinema is, among other things, a creative practice, in this course, students will be given opportunities to respond to films analytically and creatively, through writing as well as creative visual projects.

 

EAAS GU4710 The Woman Question in Modern China
Gal Gvili
W 12:10-2:00
601B Sherman Fairchild Life Sciences Building

Exploring women in modern and contemporary Chinese fiction using two focal points: the representation of women in fiction, and the voices who write about women.

 

HSEA GU4720 20th Century Tibetan History
Gray Tuttle
T 12:10-2:00
4A Kraft Center

This course is designed for students interested in gaining a broad view of Tibetan history in the 20th century. We will cover the institutional history of major Tibetan state institutions and their rivals in the Tibetan borderlands, as well as the relations with China, Britain, and America. Discussion sessions throughout the semester will focus on important historical issues.

 

HSEA GU4812 Borderlands & Frontiers: Tibet as a Case study
Gray Tuttle
Th 12:10-2:00
522A Kent Hall

Although questions of national expansion and boundary creation were fundamental to the work of such nineteenth-century American historians as Francis Parkman and Frederick Jackson Turner and twentieth century Asian historians such as Alistair Lamb and Owen Lattimore, only in recent years have these topics recaptured the historical imagination. In particular, scholars pf American history operating under the rubric of “borderlands history” have found the complex racial composition, forbidding yet fragile environment, wars of conquest, and the rapid development of the Tibetan plateau fertile terrain for a wide range of fresh approaches to the Asian past. This course will seek to bring the insights of this new scholarship into the context of Tibetan history. No longer marginal to the history of the India or China, the Tibetan borderlands should be central to on-going efforts to grapple with notions of empire and imperialism, the contingent nature of state building and of race, and transnational and comparative units of historical analysis.

 

HSEA GU4822 Troubled Islands of the Indo-Pacific
Paul Kreitman
W 2:10-4:00
507 Philosophy Hall

This course explores East Asian history (broadly defined) through a series of island case studies – including Okinawa, Jeju-do, Taiwan, Hong Kong, Singapore and Hawaii.

 

EAAS GU4840 China and the Politics of Desire
Nicholas Barlett
M 2:10-4:00
117 Barnard Hall

This course will explore the shifting figure of desire across the Maoist and post-Maoist eras by examining how academics, artists and others have represented Chinese needs, wants, and fantasies.

 

HSEA GU4882 History of Modern China II
Eugenia Lean
TR 10:10-11:25
703 Hamilton Hall

China’s transformation under its last imperial rulers, with special emphasis on economic, legal, political, and cultural change.

 

Graduate

CHNS GR5013 Selected Readings in Early Chinese Texts
Jue Guo
M 4:10-6:00
318 Milbank Hall (Barnard)

Description to come.

 

EAAS GR6200 MA Workshop in East Asian History: Historiography
Paul Kreitman
M 2:10-4:00
613 Hamilton Hall

RESTRICTED TO EALAC MA STUDENTS IN HISTORY

 

EAAS GR6400 Critical Approaches to East Asia
Gal Gvili
T 12:10-2:00
302 Fayerweather

RESTRICTED TO 1ST YEAR EALAC MA STUDENTS IN LITERATURE & CULTURAL STUDIES

 

EAAS GR6710 From Reality to Desire: Transformation of Concept of Qing
Andrew Plaks
W 10:10-12:00
522A Kent Hall

Description TBA

 

HSEA GR6862 Oracle Bones Inscriptions in Archaeological Perspective
Sakikawa Takashi
Th 2:10-4:00
522D Kent Hall

Description TBA

 

EAAS GR6990 Masters of Arts Thesis Research
Gal Gvili
TBA

Provides students the opportunity to present work in progress or final drafts to other students and relevant faculty to receive guidance and feedback.

 

EAAS GR6991 Masters of Arts Thesis Writing
Gal Gvili
TBA

Description to come.

 

JPNS GR8020 Graduate Seminar in Modern Japanese Literature
Paul Anderer
W 4:10-6:00
522C Kent Hall

Selected works in modern Japanese fiction and criticism.

 

EAAS GR8030 Seminar on Pre-modern Chinese Fiction/Drama: Fiction and Visuality
Wei Shang
M 2:10-4:00
616 Hamilton Hall

Description to come.

 

HSEA GR8060 Sources for Chinese History: Inscriptional
Robert Hymes
T 4:10-6:00
307 Mathematics Building

Description to come.

 

EARL GR9400 Readings in Japanese Religion
Michael Como
M 2:10-4:00
C01 80 Claremont Avenue

Description to come

 

EAAS GR9500 Korean Literature and Colonial Modernity
Theodore Hughes
T 4:10-6:00

Description to come.

 

EAAS GR9860 Korean Historical Texts
Jungwon Kim
M 4:10-6:00
522A Kent Hall

Description TBA

 

HSEA GR9875 Topics in Cultural History of Premodern Japan
David Lurie
W 2:10-4:00
522D Kent Hall

Prerequisites: solid command of classical Japanese. An introduction to early Japanese texts focused on the depiction of legendary rulers, primarily in the eighth century Kojiki, Nihon shoki, and Man’yoshu. Examines narrative strategies of political legitimization and considers the prominent role played by songs/poems (uta) attributed to or associated with emperors in these texts and some later works.